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ECS Moodle 3.3
by Admin User - Friday, 26 May 2017, 10:47 AM
 

Welcome to the College of Engineering and Computer Science's open source Moodle-based course/content management system. It is available as a value-added tool to those who require features not available in SacCT or who would like to develop their own modules to add new features to a CMS.

 

Available courses

Computer simulation methods to describe power system behavior under steady state and dynamic conditions. Experiments conducted using MATLAB and Simulink for load flow in distribution lines, optimal power dispatch, synchronous machine transient behavior under short circuit conditions, transient stability, voltage and reactive power control, classical and modern load frequency control.

Fundamentals of current technologies and methods in wind energy conversion systems, including turbines, generators and converters as well as control and integration of these devices with power grids. Topics include: power conversion, grid converters for wind systems, system integration, methods for power, voltage and frequency control, and wind farms simulation and aggregation methods.

Material applications in extreme environments with attention to mechanical, thermal and electronic behavior.  Advanced, novel materials for use at extreme temperature, pressure, corrosive or toxic environments and high rate deformation .  Available materials as well as emerging materials are explored for specific applications in undersea, outer space, ballistic, nuclear, combustion, and other extreme application arenas. 

This is the support material for the Engineering 45 Lab

Engr 17 Introductory Circuit Analysis, graded, 3 units

Instructor: Tatro - Fall 2018

Section 2, Call No. 82593, Mon/Wed 10:00 AM – 10:50 AM, Acad Resource Center (ARC), Room 1007

Engr 17 Introductory Circuit Analysis, graded, 3 units

Instructor: Tatro - Fall 2018

Section 1, Call No. 82558, Mon/Wed 12:00 PM – 12:50 PM, Alpine Hall, Room 148

ENGR 17. Introductory Circuit Analysis. Writing of mesh and node equations. DC and transient circuit analysis by linear differential equation techniques. Application of laws and theorems of Kirchoff, Ohm, Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer. Sinusoidal analysis using phasors, average power. Prerequisite: PHYS 11C, MATH 45; either the math or physics may be taken concurrently, but not both. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0

These are tutorials related to Materials Science Engineering to help you with your Engineering courses.

Characteristics of modern power transmission systems, Transmission line parameters, Steady-state, Dynamic and Transient behavior of AC/DC transmission systems, Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS), High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) systems, Analysis of faulted transmission systems and AC/DC hybrid grids; Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0

Engineering 45 lab - course work to support the Engr 45 lecture

Engr 17 Introductory Circuit Analysis, graded, 3 units

Instructor: Tatro - Spring 2018

Section 2, Call No. 32420, Mon/Wed 10:00 AM – 10:50 PM, Eureka Hall, Room 113

        Fri Web Online

Section 4, Call No. 32626, Mon/Wed 12:00 PM – 12:50 PM, Riverside Hall, Room 1006

        Fri Web Online

Interdisciplinary Topics in Engineering 

Engineering 45 - Engineering Materials Lab to support Engr 45 lecture

This is the Friday  Afternoon Lab

Computational methods for solving problems in analysis and design. Introduces lower division students to the use of computer technology for the computations required to solve real world problems in science and engineering. Includes introduction to numerical techniques, introduction to structured programming, and graphic visualization. Practical applications of analysis and design using MATLAB and C++ or C. Emphasis is on developing confidence and skill in finding computational solutions to practical science and engineering problems. Portable computer recommended. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: Math 30 and PHYS 11A; Physics 11A may be taken concurrently

Interdisciplinary Topics in Engineering 

Interdisciplinary Topics in Engineering 

This is the ENGR 45 promising course redesign for Tuesday at 7:30AM.

Engr 17 Introductory Circuit Analysis, graded, 3 units

Instructor: Tatro – Fall 2016

Section 1, Call No. 84063, Mon/Wed 12:00 PM – 12:50 PM, Sequoia Hall, Room 316

        Fri 12:00 PM – 12:50 PM, Web Online

Section 2, Call No. 84109, Mon/Wed 10:00 AM – 10:50 AM, Tahoe Hall, Room 1007

        Fri 10:00 PM – 10:50 PM, Web Online

Course Content:  Writing of mesh and node equations. DC and transient circuit analysis by linear differential equation techniques. Application of laws and theorems of Kirchhoff, Ohm, Thévenin, Norton and maximum power transfer. Sinusoidal analysis using phasors, average power.

Prerequisite:  Phys 11C and Math 45; either the math or physics may be taken concurrently, but not both.

Textbook:       Electric Circuits, Nilsson and Riedel, 10th Edition, 2014, Prentice Hall,

ISBN: 978-0133760033

Instructor:      Russ Tatro                                Office:  Riverside 5030

                        email: rtatro@csus.edu  Website:  www.csus.edu/indiv/t/tatror

                        Office Phone: 278-4878          

                        Office Hours: See my website for current office hours.

The course is designed for graduate students and discusses advanced topics in power systems.

This is the Promising Course Redesign Lab section for Monday 8:00AM students.

This workshop is designed for incoming freshman in MEP to enhance your success as an engineering student and as a person. Its purpose is to improve student success, to make the college experience more relevant to career goals, and to help students obtain as much assistance from the University as possible while working towards their engineering degrees.

The MEP Workshop is for newly admitted MEP students for the spring, 2015 semester. This workshop is designed to enhance success as an engineering and computer science student. Weekly topics will review key resources needed to be successful as a new student to Sacramento State as well as help to develop personal and professional skills to prepare students for the workforce.


CPE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: CSC 15 or CSC 25. Cross Listed: EEE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

EEE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: Engr 50. Cross Listed: CpE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

CPE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: CSC 15 or CSC 25. Cross Listed: EEE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

EEE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: Engr 50. Cross Listed: CpE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

CPE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: CSC 15 or CSC 25. Cross Listed: EEE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

EEE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: Engr 50. Cross Listed: CpE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

CPE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: CSC 15 or CSC 25. Cross Listed: EEE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

EEE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: Engr 50. Cross Listed: CpE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

CPE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: CSC 15 or CSC 25. Cross Listed: EEE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

EEE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: Engr 50. Cross Listed: CpE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

CPE 187. Embedded Processor System Design. Students will design, construct and test an embedded processor system project. All address decoding, control functions, input and output ports, handshaking signals and interrupt control will be implemented in an FPGA. The system will interface to a microcontroller system. Students will use an assembler, a C compiler and either VHDL or Verilog to fully test their project. Laboratory techniques include oscilloscopes, logic analyzers, protocol analyzers and programmers for EPROMs, FLASH and microcontrollers. One lecture per week and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CPE 166, CPE 185, EEE 102, and (GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M/W). Graded: Graded Student. Units: 2.0

CPE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: CSC 15 or CSC 25. Cross Listed: EEE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

EEE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: Engr 50. Cross Listed: CpE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

CPE 187. Embedded Processor System Design. Students will design, construct and test an embedded processor system project. All address decoding, control functions, input and output ports, handshaking signals and interrupt control will be implemented in an FPGA. The system will interface to a microcontroller system. Students will use an assembler, a C compiler and either VHDL or Verilog to fully test their project. Laboratory techniques include oscilloscopes, logic analyzers, protocol analyzers and programmers for EPROMs, FLASH and microcontrollers. One lecture per week and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CPE 166, CPE 185, EEE 102, and (GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M/W). Graded: Graded Student. Units: 2.0

CPE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: CSC 15 or CSC 25. Cross Listed: EEE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

EEE 64. Introduction to Logic Design. 
Prerequisite: Engr 50. Cross Listed: CpE 64; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 4.0

Computational methods for solving problems in analysis and design. Introduces lower division students to the use of computer technology for the computations required to solve real world problems in science and engineering. Includes introduction to numerical techniques, introduction to structured programming, and graphic visualization. Practical applications of analysis and design using MATLAB and C++ or C. Emphasis is on developing confidence and skill in finding computational solutions to practical science and engineering problems. Portable computer recommended. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: Math 30 and PHYS 11A; Physics 11A may be taken concurrently

The EEE 117 network analysis laboratory will reinforce concepts learned in both the ENGR 17 and EEE 117 lectures.  The students will be introduced to circuit simulation and testing. 

The EEE 117 network analysis laboratory will reinforce concepts learned in both the ENGR 17 and EEE 117 lectures.  The students will be introduced to circuit simulation and testing.   

EEE 117. Network Analysis. Review of Sinusoidal steady state, phasors, complex power, three phase power, mutual inductance, series and parallel resonance. Introduction to application of Laplace transforms in network analysis, transfer functions, Bode plots, Fourier series, two-port circuits. Prerequisite: ENGR 17, EEE 64; EEE 64 may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: EEE 117L. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0

Computational methods for solving problems in analysis and design. Introduces lower division students to the use of computer technology for the computations required to solve real world problems in science and engineering. Includes introduction to numerical techniques, introduction to structured programming, and graphic visualization. Practical applications of analysis and design using MATLAB and C++ or C. Emphasis is on developing confidence and skill in finding computational solutions to practical science and engineering problems. Portable computer recommended. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: Math 30 and PHYS 11A; Physics 11A may be taken concurrently

The EEE 117 network analysis laboratory will reinforce concepts learned in both the ENGR 17 and EEE 117 lectures.  The students will be introduced to circuit simulation and testing.   

EEE 117. Network Analysis. Review of Sinusoidal steady state, phasors, complex power, three phase power, mutual inductance, series and parallel resonance. Introduction to application of Laplace transforms in network analysis, transfer functions, Bode plots, Fourier series, two-port circuits. Prerequisite: ENGR 17, EEE 64; EEE 64 may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: EEE 117L. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0

Computational methods for solving problems in analysis and design. Introduces lower division students to the use of computer technology for the computations required to solve real world problems in science and engineering. Includes introduction to numerical techniques, introduction to structured programming, and graphic visualization. Practical applications of analysis and design using MATLAB and C++ or C. Emphasis is on developing confidence and skill in finding computational solutions to practical science and engineering problems. Portable computer recommended. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: Math 30 and PHYS 11A; Physics 11A may be taken concurrently

The EEE 117 network analysis laboratory will reinforce concepts learned in both the ENGR 17 and EEE 117 lectures.  The students will be introduced to circuit simulation and testing.   

EEE 146 - Power Electronics - Spring 2018

Instructor:  Mr. Russ Tatro

EEE 117 Network Analysis, 3 units

Spring 2018, Section 1, Call No. 32625, Mon/Wed 11:00 – 11:50 A.M.  Amador Hall, Room 314

                                                                               Fri  Web Online – individual preparation

The EEE 117 network analysis laboratory will reinforce concepts learned in both the ENGR 17 and EEE 117 lectures.  The students will be introduced to circuit simulation and testing.

Review of the fundamentals in electric energy systems; power flow analysis, disturbance of normal operating conditions, symmetrical components and sequence impedances, analysis of balanced and unbalanced faults; a brief review of protection systems; optimum allocation and dispatching of generators; dynamic system control; introduction to stability studies. Students in the course will use MATLAB to solve problems.

EEE 146 - Power Electronics - Fall 2017 

Instructor:  Mr. Russ Tatro

Engr 17 - Fall 2017 - Tatro

EEE 117 - Section 1 - Fall 2017 - Instructor: Tatro

Future power systems from component and system perspectives. Smart grids, micro-grids, and interactive power systems using renewable resources and energy storage elements. National standards for certification of distributed generation involving machine-based and inverter-based technologies. Essential elements of advanced sensing, communications and information technology and their roles in adaptive automation, control, protection, and security.

The EEE 117 network analysis laboratory will reinforce concepts learned in both the ENGR 17 and EEE 117 lectures.  The students will be introduced to circuit simulation and testing.   

Characteristics of power system components. Transmission line parameters and the steady state performance of transmission lines. Introduction to solutions of linear and nonlinear algebraic equations using Gauss, Gauss-Seidel, and Newton-Raphson techniques. Introduction to power flow analysis.

EEE 193A. Product Design Project I. Concentrates on the planning and design of electronic engineering devices, systems and software. Emphasis is placed on design philosophies, problem definition, project planning and budgeting, written and oral communication skills, teamwork, development of specifications, utilization of computer aided design systems, and effective utilization of available resources. Lecture one hour; laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EEE 108, EEE 109, EEE 130, EEE 161, EEE 174, EEE 180, passing score on the WPE, GE Oral Communication requirement; EEE 109 may be taken concurrently. 2 units. 

CPE 190. Senior Design Project I. Centers on developing hardware and software project planning and engineering design skills. Emphasis is placed on design philosophies, problem definition, project planning and budgeting, written and oral communication skills, working with others in a team arrangement, development of specifications and effective utilization of available resources. Lecture one hour per week, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: CPE 142, CPE 166, CPE 186, CPE 187, EEE 102, and (GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M/W). Graded: Graded Student. Units: 2.0 

EEE 146 Power Electronics, 3 units

Fall 2016, Section 1, Call No. 88260, Mon 1:30 P.M. - 2:45 P.M., ARC 1014

 Wed Web Online

 

EEE109L this is the lab class for the EEE109 lecture course on Electrontics II

EEE 109. Electronics II. Differential and multistage amplifiers, high frequency models (BJTs and FETs), feedback and sensitivity, power amplifiers, oscillators and waveform shaping circuits. Advanced use of PSPICE. Lecture three hours; laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EEE 108, EEE 108L, EEE 117, EEE 117L; passing score on the WPE.. 4 units.

EEE 117. Network Analysis. Review of Sinusoidal steady state, phasors, complex power, three phase power, mutual inductance, series and parallel resonance. Introduction to application of Laplace transforms in network analysis, transfer functions, Bode plots, Fourier series, two-port circuits. Prerequisite: ENGR 17, EEE 64; EEE 64 may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: EEE 117L. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0

EEE 117 Network Analysis, 3 units

Fall 2016, Section 1, Call No. 83880, Tu/Th 10:30 – 11:45 A.M.  Amador Hall, Room 219

 

EEE 146 Power Electronics, 3 units

Fall 2016, Section 1, Call No. 88260, Mon 1:30 P.M. - 2:45 P.M., ARC 1014  Wed Web Online

 

 

EEE 131. Electromechanics Laboratory. Direct current motor and generator characteristics, three phase synchronous motor and synchronous generator characteristics, single phase power transformer short circuit and no-load tests, frequency changer tests and tests on DC and AC machine models, potential and current transformers. Prerequisite: EEE 117, EEE 130 (EEE 130 may be taken concurrently), and (GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M/W). Graded: Graded Student. Units: 1.0

Future power systems from component and system perspectives. Smart grids, micro-grids, and interactive power systems using renewable resources and energy storage elements. National standards for certification of distributed generation involving machine-based and inverter-based technologies. Essential elements of advanced sensing, communications and information technology and their roles in adaptive automation, control, protection, and security.

Review of the fundamentals in electric energy systems; power flow analysis, disturbance of normal operating conditions, symmetrical components and sequence impedances, analysis of balanced and unbalanced faults; a brief review of protection systems; optimum allocation and dispatching of generators; dynamic system control; introduction to stability studies. Students in the course will use MATLAB to solve problems.

Research methodology and engineering approach to problem solving. Includes an orientation to the requirements for Master's thesis in Mechanical Engineering. Students will be exposed to a variety of possible thesis topics. Students will be required to complete an essay concerning aspects of engineering research. The student will be required to prepare a presentation and also review other students work.Note: Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course.Prerequisite: Graduate status in Mechanical Engineering.

ME 105 - Intro to Tech Problem Solving (3 Units)

Research methodology and engineering approach to problem solving. Includes an orientation to the requirements for Master's thesis in Mechanical Engineering. Students will be exposed to a variety of possible thesis topics. Students will be required to complete an essay concerning aspects of engineering research. The student will be required to prepare a presentation and also review other students work.

Advanced Materials Development and Characterization (AMDaC)

Research experience for undergraduate and graduate students in Materials Science Engineering.

Material applications in extreme environments with attention to mechanical, thermal and electronic behavior.  Advanced, novel materials for use at extreme temperature, pressure, corrosive or toxic environments and high rate deformation .  Available materials as well as emerging materials are explored for specific applications in undersea, outer space, ballistic, nuclear, combustion, and other extreme application arenas.  

Research methodology and engineering approach to problem solving. Includes an orientation to the requirements for Master's thesis in Mechanical Engineering. Students will be exposed to a variety of possible thesis topics. Students will be required to complete an essay concerning aspects of engineering research. The student will be required to prepare a presentation and also review other students work.

ME 128 Sections: 

ME 128-07 LAB (36426)
ME 128-08 LAB (36835)

Research methodology and engineering approach to problem solving. Includes an orientation to the requirements for Master's thesis in Mechanical Engineering. Students will be exposed to a variety of possible thesis topics. Students will be required to complete an essay concerning aspects of engineering research. The student will be required to prepare a presentation and also review other students work.

Comprehensive study of mechanical properties of materials, with special attention to dislocations/defects and deformormation and fracture control mechanisms. Mechanical properties of of conventional engineering materials as well as advanced materials such as nanostructured materials are considered. Effects of defects on mechanical behavior at ambient and elevated temperature are discussed with attention given to strengthening mechanisms, creep, fatigue and fracture.

Introduction to the phenomena of corrosion and wear, including the electro-mechanical bases of corrosion, examples of corrosion of iron, steel and stainless steels, and prevention of corrosion. Fundamentals of wear are covered including effects of loads, material properties, and lubrication on wear rates.

Quantitative treatment of materials selection for engineering applications. Discussion of the relationship between design constraints and materials properties. Emphasis on the influence of processing and fabrication on the properties of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites as related to the overall design process. Sustainability and Eco-Design are considered during the material selection step with regard to manufacturability.

Beginning of a two semester project; design of a product, device, or apparatus that will be fabricated in ME 191. Students work in small groups, interacting with product users, vendors, technicians, and faculty advisors. Lecture two hours; laboratory three hours.

This course website contains materials and assignments for Prof. Topping's E45 labs.

Support for E 45 - Engineering Materials

In-depth graphical analysis and solution of typical three-dimensional space problems by applying the principles of orthogonal projection. Fundamentals of interactive computer aided design and drafting. Preparation of engineering drawings utilizing the CAD system.
Fluid and thermal laboratory course.

Moodle 2 Testing course for Dr. Tatro and John Jones to solve roadblocks and hurdles. e.g. Question bank development, Course layout, and anything else we need to work on.  Results of this testing should be able to be used as templates for other courses.

This is a course to provide training material for the ECS Help Desk.

Intro session for ECS faculty
The EJC represents all of the student organizations in the College of Engineering & Computer Science.
For Korean Student Association Members to talk